New Release: A Bride for David

While researching life in the 19th century, I became fascinated with the quirky octagon fad that was popular in the mid-19th century. The Octagon House, A Home for All, written by Orson Fowler, promoted an idealistic movement in architecture to promote efficiency of building materials, improved natural lighting, and ventilation.

A tree in front of a building

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A circle is the most efficient shape but challenging to build. “An octagon is a shape within a circle. It contains eight sides, eight angles, and has straight sides that connect. Thomas Jefferson built his home in the configuration.

Thomas Jefferson Octagon Shaped Home PoplarForest

The eight-sided octagon maximizes living space, receives more natural light, is easier to heat, and remains cool during the summer months. The design includes a flat roof, which has cisterns built in to collect and distribute water.

T.M. Younglove Octagon House built in 1859.

The Octagon home seemed the perfect place for geometry loving,  Mathematics teacher, Daisy Murphy. She agrees to participate in a new matchmaking service organized by her pastor and the matron of the orphanage where she has spent the last fifteen years. Romantic, yet practical, Daisy’s systematically eliminated all candidates but one and anticipates getting to know him better through months of correspondence.
Time is not on the side of David Taylor. He has a nephew and niece to think about, and his attorney has warned him he will lose custody of both to their rich grandfather if he doesn’t have a wife. A teacher longing for security, a businessman about to lose the only family he has; and a proxy marriage that can give them both exactly what they need.  

 A teacher longing for security, a businessman about to lose the only family he has; and a proxy marriage that can give them both exactly what they need.  

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